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Good residents can help police more

September 27th 2017

Last week, the BBC shared that the number of abandoned 999 calls to UK police control rooms had more than doubled in the last year, and the number of abandoned 101 calls had increased to 230,000.

Experts suggest the increase is partly due to an increase in crime. However, it has been solidly acknowledged that resources throughout all UK police forces are so critically low, mainly due to budget cuts, that public safety could possibly be compromised.

There’s a lot of strong opinions surrounding this news, but it is important to take clear messages from these findings:

1. The police would benefit from more appropriate help and support from residents

2. Residents can, and should, be more active and responsible in the interest of community safety

Residents are the eyes and ears for the community and are usually witnesses to crime or anti-social behaviours.

The tools needed to create a society where residents and police work together already exist. In Trygve, we see this working first hand.

Anti-social behaviour – tackled together

Anti-social behaviour is unacceptable activity that causes harm to an individual, to their community or to their environment, such as prostitution, littering, rowdiness, street drinking, begging or vandalism.

We are seeing an increase in Trygve communities working together to combat anti-social behaviour, alongside their local cops.

Local police officers create local Trygve groups for the area and encourage residents to get involved.

The group chat is then utilised to collect a log of anti-social behaviour in the area, so police can build a case and intervene. Residents can see each other’s posts and offer help or suggest when a call to the police is necessary. Groups like these have directly led to the arrest of local criminals – see blog story.

The Trygve map is then used to let any Trygve user in the area know when an incident is occurring so they can either help or avoid the area. See example.

Police also share successful arrests or positive progress to boost the morale of the neighbourhood. See example.

Residents turn their frustrations into helpful and effective collaboration, assisting police and being part of the solution.

“It’s made us a more active community, rather than just expecting the police to be aware of every issue. Now we have a relationship with them,” a London resident said.

Try it in your neighbourhood!

Whether police or a resident, it is time to realise that we are all partly responsible for our neighbourhoods, including the safety and security of them. If we effectively utilise all our resources, including ourselves, we can together make our society stronger and safer.

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Trygve brings communities together to build a stronger, safer society